The immense popularity of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea reintroduced Jules Verne to a science-fiction hungry audience, 85...

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JULES VERNE

The immense popularity of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea reintroduced Jules Verne to a science-fiction hungry audience, 85 years later. Keeping her high standard of other biographies, Catherine Owens Peare writes a clean cut, simply styled life of the man behind the books. From on the scene reports of Verne's boyhood in Nantes, themes of science are strongly accented as Jules and his brother, Paul, are excited by an uncle's stories from the outside world, by inventions of their time, like the telegraph and the steamboat. Jules ran away to be a cabin boy, in true storybook fashion. It is a realistic account, too, of his struggle to be a writer, of days of toil and hardship in Paris, and of ultimate success in the stories that set the imagination of his readers afire. Use this as a bridging book to reading Verne. Or build on the existing interest to lead from fiction to fact.

Pub Date: March 26, 1956

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Henry Holt

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1956