An earlier book, The Grown-Ups, pictured children exposed to a particularly offensive adult world, and in this such a...

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THE DOOR TO THE GARDEN

An earlier book, The Grown-Ups, pictured children exposed to a particularly offensive adult world, and in this such a situation is explored further, for it is the influence of Papa and Aunt Q that conditions Kate and her younger siser, Bunny, for a world against which Kate rebels, Bunny succumbs. For Kate will have none of the adults' pious, false slogans, is the scorned child, while Bunny, watching Kate's growing despair, learns to ape and quote them. It is only when Kate comes to work in New York and learns to love Jim that she is able, after near defeat by the hold of the grown-ups, to make her break from childhood complete. Here are the frustrations, the guilt, and the disintegration that oppression, hatred and impersonal wickedness can breed when children are subjected to selfish, dominant relatives; here is the chaos in later life as a result of those influences. Symbolically described and handled with a feeling for psychological patterns, this is for the more selective reader.

Pub Date: Jan. 6, 1948

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1948