Still another entry in the World War II Anglo-American spystakes which includes Winterbotham's The Ultra Secret (1974), Cave...

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THE SPYMASTERS: The True Story of Anglo-American Intelligence Operations Within Nazi Germany 1939-1945

Still another entry in the World War II Anglo-American spystakes which includes Winterbotham's The Ultra Secret (1974), Cave Brown's Bodyguard of Lies (1975) and Stevenson's A Man Called Intrepid (p. 58). Of them all, Intrepid is written from the supersecret sources of the highest authority and possesses the most eagie-eyed and thrilling view of the entire mind-bending shadow network. Indeed, Whiting relates his difficulties in gathering information for the present book and it seems evident that many sources were closed to him because Stevenson's book was being given preferential treatment. The Spymasters is by far the most difficult to unravel; its incidents fly by in a tom cat's cradle of double-agents and traitors leaping about the Continent. These master spies are professionals, not small-fry resistance and emigrÉ espionage groups. They operate mainly out of ""the old firm"" (British Secret Intelligence Service) and their objective is the infiltration of ""Twelveland"" (Germany) and the Abwehr. (Nazi Secret Service). Among the schemes detailed are the assassination plots against Hitler's life, including one attempt to doctor his vegetables (he was a vegetarian) with sex hormones, thereby upsetting his whole hormonal balance. The book focuses on the heads of the various services and famous spies such as Kim Philby and George Wood. Passably intriguing.

Pub Date: March 16, 1976

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Saturday Review/Dutton

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1976