The humorist's most prolific compiler--editor of eight previous Twain anthologies--presents another new collection. Though...

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MARK TWAIN AT HIS BEST: A Comprehensive Sampler

The humorist's most prolific compiler--editor of eight previous Twain anthologies--presents another new collection. Though this seems an unnecessary edition, it does provide a broad smorgasbord of Twain's various styles, including stories, sketches, speeches, memoirs, letters, and selections from his novels and travel writings. Certainly, Twain's writing has survived the reincarnation. The outrageous bawdy exuberance is still in the famous raft scene that was written for Huckleberry Finn and appeared in Life on the Mississippi. The hilarity is in ""The McWilliamses and the Burglar Alarm."" The common-sense sarcasm is in ""Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses."" The stinging satire is still in ""To the Person Sitting in Darkness."" Neider's lengthy piece-by-piece introduction adds little, rehashing the details of his construction of Twain's autobiography and lavishing unenlightening praise on the master. The best introduction to Twain--and still the volume most deserving the title Mark Twain at his Best--is the book called The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, which demonstrates the full range of his humorous, satirical, dramatic and descriptive powers.

Pub Date: Oct. 3, 1986

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 1986