This is a short account of Betty Lee, Mrs. Tucker's daughter, who was injured by a cerebral hemorrhage at birth and could...

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BETTY LEE

This is a short account of Betty Lee, Mrs. Tucker's daughter, who was injured by a cerebral hemorrhage at birth and could never develop normally. From the always hopeful search for a doctor who would reverse the first diagnosis, to the search for the right school, and eventually the inevitable but regretted separation from her, Mrs. Tucker widens the lessons learned from her own experience and applies them to the general problems of the handicapped child. For parents, there must be a recognition and acceptance of the condition; certain adjustments must be made- but morale must be maintained- as well as discipline; and the attitudes of society at large must be as normal as possible. Closing chapters deal with the specific types of speech defects, mental disorders, and other physical handicaps and the educational and vocational help which is available. There is certainly not the personal interest here that certain books of this kind have had- Karen. My Son's Story, etc.- Mrs. Tucker's sentimentality is unsubdued- but her experience may have its practical value for other parents who are faced with this problem.

Pub Date: March 30, 1954

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1954