An up and at 'em newspaperwoman from Milwaukee manages to make her way into many of the world's trouble spots as she plies...

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An up and at 'em newspaperwoman from Milwaukee manages to make her way into many of the world's trouble spots as she plies her trade following World War II, in which she had served with the Red Cross in the Far East. Her story has the immediacy of personal encounter as she crashes Manchuria with several American correspondents in 1946, meets Madame Chiang Kai-Shek at the Kuling retreat before the final overthrow, talks with North Korean farmers before the Korean War and chats about Syngman Rhee, accompanies the French Foreign Legion for a time in Cambodia and wonders at Suzanne Travers, their female co-fighter. She follows Wallace in Israel, comes upon sonnet- writing psychiatrist Moore, traverses the Kyber Pass, Kashmir, the South Seas, the Orient Express. In short, she is all over the place, with lively interest in people and a determination to find odd facts and important ones -- and to marry a certain newsman. She manages very well altogether, though a few more specific dates might have made the traveling schedule easier for the reader. Lively personal reporting.

Pub Date: Feb. 21, 1954

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1954