Children's Express is the magazine that, interviewing Amy Carter, scooped adult reporters at the Democratic National...

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Children's Express is the magazine that, interviewing Amy Carter, scooped adult reporters at the Democratic National Convention. Since then, they've interviewed many other children, often at roundtable discussions, and catalogued their remarks on important issues: family, divorce, school, sex, TV, money, gripes, friendship (""If you don't have anybody to care about you, you're just not going to be able to survive""). Although many seem to hold compatible views of the world, there's little attempt to summarize or conclude. Kids talk about what's most embarrassing about their parents, what it's like to have dyslexia or a teacher who sticks gum on the chewer's nose--a broad mix of subjects. Occasionally, the young editors (13, 14) comment. One, after working with mental-hospital children, said of the participants: ""The kids were not that articulate, I had to work much harder with them. They shielded themselves, they were less straight, they had less ambition, and they didn't feel good about themselves."" Sometimes statements sound parroted (Patrick, age 9: ""you grow up in a sexist world, and you grow up in a sexist way, so that you're not used to seeing boys or men cry""), but more often they sound genuine (""Why do you think God is a man?"" ""Because God isn't a woman's name""). There's very little of the Art Linkletter blushing revelations, and no sign of Dick-and-Jane pieties. Even if you don't pass along one girl's suggestions that Coca-Cola is the best douche, you'll see the book's merits.

Pub Date: Dec. 18, 1978

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Workman

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 1978