A guide to ""developing and producing your own television programming,"" geared chiefly for classroom-workshop study. Most...

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THE ELECTRIC JOURNALIST: An Introduction to Video

A guide to ""developing and producing your own television programming,"" geared chiefly for classroom-workshop study. Most of the book is devoted to introducing the basic operation of the videotape recording and receiving systems and to explaining such technical processes as ""writing"" with a TV camera (from story board to camera shots), assembling a ""TV magazine"" (from titles and production crew to electronic editing), caring for videotapes, and conducting street interviews. The interspersed exercises, however, are not technical at all, but involve matters of editorial content in which the author exhibits little interest. Students are asked to ""discuss"" general quotations of the global village/vast wasteland variety, to keep charts of their viewing habits, to write to networks for policy statements (though network policy is not discussed here), or to ""play word association games"" with slogans from commercials. Content suggestions are equally offhand: ""Prepare a slide and sound essay on fashions, drug abuse, or student rights. . . make a short 8 mm or 16 mm film about hands, noses, walking or some other theme. . . prepare a newscast. . . ."" The book concludes with a brief rundown on the ""video underground,"" from the Woodstock-spawned Video Freex to the community Video Project at the Port Washington, New York, Public Library, and a chapter on the promise of cable TV. Implications of the all-electronic lifestyle of the future are left to ""social scientists, psychologists and anthropologists,"" and applications -- both technical and otherwise -- of The Electric Journalist must be left to a creative media teacher.

Pub Date: Sept. 30, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Praeger

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1973