It all seems to have started with Linda Nochlin's Art News challenge, ""Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?"" These...

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ART TALK: Conversations with 12 Women Artists

It all seems to have started with Linda Nochlin's Art News challenge, ""Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?"" These days, the feminists are leaving no stones unturned in the art field in their search for the female counterparts to Pollock, de Keening, Warhol. Nemser, from The Feminist Art Journal, will put herself at the head of the crusade with this collection of her conversations with women artists. (N.B., those pre-publication envois.) For one reason or another, Georgia O'Keefe, Helen Frankenthaler, Joan Mitchell and Bridget Riley declined to be taped; but twelve ladies of stature from several generations consented, making this a rich and rounded overview of the 20th century scene, from Paris to Greenwich Village's Cedar Bar -- there's Barbara Hepworth (monumental sculptures); Sonia Delauny (her paintings look like her husband's even if ""Robert was not secure at all""); the gorgeously flamboyant Louise Nevelson; Lee Krasner (whose work does not reflect husband Pollock's); Grace Hartigan, who's asked to explain why she used to be known as George Hartigan; sculptor Marisol; and then the younger, more conceptual and far-out Hesse, Katzen, Antin, Flack, Grossman. Nemser is rather too eager and overweening, always popping leading questions like ""You must have had all sorts of ambivalent feelings about being a mother and having a child"" -- harping on all those conflicts between the ""image of a proper woman"" and that ""overpowering commitment to. . . art."" Oh these Johnny-come-Besser-wissers.

Pub Date: April 1, 1975

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Scribners

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1975