Claire Fejes had lived in Fairbanks with her husband for fifteen years and had two growing children when the Far Northland...

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THE PEOPLE OF THE NOATAK

Claire Fejes had lived in Fairbanks with her husband for fifteen years and had two growing children when the Far Northland called her away to Sheshalik, Alaska, where she might find Eskimos to paint. From the time a woman in a canoe said ""I am Okukchuk. We are Real Eskimos"" and she replied in kind, ""I am Clara. I live in Fairbanks,"" she felt simpatico. At Sheshalik, Clara painted, held art classss for the children, helped the women cut beluga (white whale)--an act which won their acceptance forever. Later, at Point Hope, she made friends with the Tigara, with the serene Ahgaik, with David who made her mukluks, with little Rosa who called her her atka. She writes with warmth of the people of the Noatak, with dispassion of their hard lives, particularly the tuberculosis which harried them. The painter saw faces and these she sketches with love. She comes across as a woman and an artist, not a social scientist. Her drawings (not seen here) add to the intimacy of the portrait.

Pub Date: Nov. 14, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1966