The Uncertainty of Desire,"" ""The Seriousness of Seduction,"" ""The Truths of Love,"" and ""The Solitude of Pleasure"" --...

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ALL WOMEN ARE FATAL

The Uncertainty of Desire,"" ""The Seriousness of Seduction,"" ""The Truths of Love,"" and ""The Solitude of Pleasure"" -- the chapter subtitles tell the story or lack of it in Mauriac's latest literary finger exercise. Once again Bertrand Carnejoux, before the years of his marriage in The Dinner Party and The Marquis Went Out At Five is the explicator-voyeur who watches women, all women, on a Rio beach or a New York City street. But which woman will become the object of his glances, his desires, his existence since he believes that ""existence is sex""? Even if all women are interchangeable, why not know them all, -- Pascale, Leslie, rene, Christiane, Francine, in seriatim. Then there's his recurrent fixation upon Marie-Prune, married now to his cousin and inaccessible. In spite of himself, the philosopher errant succumbs to the myth of ""one woman"" without ever admitting it. In the end even physical passion becomes a solitary pleasure... Mauriac has enjoyed a certain vogue in the nouvelle vague; this is no more than a labor of love.

Pub Date: June 15, 1964

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Braziller

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 1964

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