This is fictionalized autobiography about a summer that Mr. Stuart recalls in directly involving detail. It was the year...

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SHOOT AN ARROW TO STOP THE WIND

This is fictionalized autobiography about a summer that Mr. Stuart recalls in directly involving detail. It was the year that Colin Kasaunka Stuart, sixteen, returned to his home a few miles south of the Canadian border, a tiny community once founded by his Scottish great-grandfather and his Blackfoot wife ""Aunt Nora-Lassie"" who still lives and dominates a good portion of the book--as she recalls eighty-three winters and copes happily with the present which finds her living in a tent and shuttling easily between the old and the new ways. Her first ride in an airplane--then a phenomenon--is a touching high point in the book. Then there's his Uncle Alec, her grandson with his six foot Irish wife Aunt Peg; Duncan, Alec's brother also home on a visit from college and reconciling his own problem of being a ""breed."" It's a summer of fights and fun and loss of innocence and first love and memories and adjustment. An Indian summer to experience.

Pub Date: Feb. 19, 1969

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Dial

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1969