Noisy and damp with much weeping and gnashing of teeth, another of Freeman's acrylic domestic romances, this one beginning...

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THE LAST PRINCESS

Noisy and damp with much weeping and gnashing of teeth, another of Freeman's acrylic domestic romances, this one beginning in the 1930's and touching down (in 20-plus years) in upstate New York, Manhattan, and Westchester, with brief stops in Israel, Hollywood, and Europe. Lily Goodhue and Harry Kohle had both been dumped by rich parents on the occasion of the young couple's mixed marriage. With a tiny legacy, they buy a farmhouse upstate, and four babies are born--to Harry's pride and also dismay. Lily, the good wife, then decides to support Harry, while he writes his novel, by selling homemade preserves and handmade clothes. As Lily toils on, Harry produces a Great Novel. He's on his way up--way, way up--while being a rotten father (the eldest son will die tragically), and being very casual about the sacrifices of the Little Woman, who has tried so hard: ""You have to try to interact with the children,"" Lily begs. Then it's on to classier addresses--and for Harry a mistress, until Lily surprises them in the sack. it looks as if Lily will never win back Harry, but she tries. (Alas, after she's got a face lift and a Paris wardrobe, Harry. seeing the result for the first time, comments: ""I hope you didn't do this for me."") There's a contented year with Harry belore he packs it in, though, followed by a new interest and perhaps a new love for Lily. A nonstop mulling over relationships, with little light or heat, in spite of all the moaning and weeping. Still, Freeman has her following.

Pub Date: April 4, 1988

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Putnam

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 1988