One of the most widely known of present-day, ""birthright"" members of the Society of Friends undertakes here an account of...

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THE PEOPLE CALLED QUAKERS

One of the most widely known of present-day, ""birthright"" members of the Society of Friends undertakes here an account of the Quaker movement as a contribution to the present pursuit of ecumenicity among various communions in the Church. The book is not intended as a strict history of Quakerism but draws upon historical events and developments to illuminate the basic tenets upon which the Society was founded and has endured. Dr. Trueblood believes that any true revival of religion in our day must come about through a fresh appropriation of certain religious principles, at least some of which are central in Quakerism. Chief among these is the idea that all men can have a direct experience of Christ, without benefit or need of intermediaries. Worship, Ministry, the ""Peace Testimony"" and various social concerns, and the Friends' contributions in science, education and culture are among the subjects treated. Here, too, familiar Quaker names--Fox, Penn, Pennington, Woolman, Barclay and others, become the identifications of living personalities of considerable force and gifts. Von Hugel was probably right in saying that the Quakers could exist precisely because this is a non-Quaker world; but the reader of this book will gain a fresh appreciation for the singular contribution, out of all proportion to their numbers, that has been and can be made by the ""people called Quakers."" The book should enjoy a wide readership.

Pub Date: May 25, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harper & Row

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1966