This has little of the appeal of its predecessor, Magnificent Barb, though again there is a boy-cum-house situation, but so...

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DREAM IN THE STONE

This has little of the appeal of its predecessor, Magnificent Barb, though again there is a boy-cum-house situation, but so shrouded in the mists of folk tale, mysticism, and an merging and crossing of periods of time that the emotional qualities of the earlier book are looking. Jorgon Anders, hardboy of Jutland, sired by a merman- and brought up by grandparents who sent him inland lost he lose himself wholly in the love of the sea- returns at the start of the story, to the seashore village from his inland apprenticeship. On the way he sees a dream horse, a golden stallion. And as he approaches home he is met by his foster sister, Lone, and they find the childhood bond strengthened by maturity, and realization that they alone can see through the mists creatures of other days. Paralleling their story is the mystical tale of Erik Thele, half demon, and his golden stallion, Sleipnir, and of his beloved Maren of the golden hair, whom he can love but not wed, because of the black haired wife far away. Erik uses his stallion to tempt ships onto the rocks. He grows rich in salvage. And Maren taunts him- and wins his stallion from him. The children half see and never comprehend the significance of the play of evil and beauty at Gannets Rock. It is there Jorgen talks with his ghostly father. It is there that death seems the only answer, translation to a world of which he seems a part. But like much of the telling, the end is half dream, and left to the reader's interpretation. Gaelic fantasy; not easy reading.

Pub Date: Oct. 28, 1948

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Messner

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1948