Any book of 96 short illustrated pages that begins with a description of Tinkerbell, considers the view that the little...

READ REVIEW

THE MAGIC OF THE LITTLE PEOPLE

Any book of 96 short illustrated pages that begins with a description of Tinkerbell, considers the view that the little people are immigrants from other planets via UFO's, and devotes a chapter to the ""fairy photos"" (taken in 1917 by two girls who won Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's credulity) is unlikely to throw much light on the origins and nature of the species. In truth, Cohen does discuss both the possibility that the various mischievous creatures of folklore are old pagan gods demoted by Christianity and the ""Pygmy theory"" holding that the beliefs stem from an actual race of small humans who took to the woods upon the arrival of the Celts in the British Isles and northern Europe. Mainly though this is a loose catalog of idle (mostly British) lore -- of dwarves, elves and sidhe, hobgoblins, boggarts and bugaboos, and a random sampling of one each little creature from the Eskimo, Russian, Aztec and other cultures. Still it's the easiest introduction we know to the little people who are just now very big.

Pub Date: April 22, 1974

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 96

Publisher: Messner

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1974