Clinically, diagnostically the case of Leon Wolny is followed during a little more than a year's span when his isolation,...

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ANGRY HARVEST

Clinically, diagnostically the case of Leon Wolny is followed during a little more than a year's span when his isolation, self denial and routine are destroyed after he gives refuge to a Jewish girl, Rosa. A coachman's son in service to the Kaminska family, Leon has risen, prospered, and is now, in 1943, aiming even higher on his Polish farm, outside the terrorized area, and, not condoning the black market or profit from the dispossessed Jews, he still takes advantage that will advance his dreams of becoming a personage in his parish. Rosa's needs -- first of a hiding place, next of care during her illness -- break through his barriers; love completes the crackdown, and her capitulation gains him strange rumors in the village. The dangers of harboring her, the tricks he must employ to keep her hidden, the threats of discovery are woven into his participation in underground activities, scandals involving his neighbors, and eventually, the obligation he feels he must pay to old Lady Kaminska and her daughter....And the love he has felt for Rosa turns to a nattering dislike, to a deeper hatred, until he drives her to suicide which in turn almost turns him into a fugitive. But the old rationalization, self justification restores him to his farm.... "".... no one can live entirely in isolation...the greatest source of happiness lies just where danger lies...in other people..."" This is Leon's lesson told in the many aspects of passive evil, in the counterpoint of farm life, in the ruthless drive of the war, and of those whose stories impinge on his. A thick tapestry for a sober, serious audience.

Pub Date: Feb. 28, 1957

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Crowell

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1957