With equal facility for characterization and description, Howarth plots the history of Panama from the times of the Spanish...

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PANAMA

With equal facility for characterization and description, Howarth plots the history of Panama from the times of the Spanish conquistadors to the nuclear conquistadors of the U.S. who want to atom bomb their way through the isthmus and build a new canal. Figures appear, such as the eerily demented Columbus, who never left his ship; the unforgettable Balboa, wading into the Pacific and claiming it for Spain; Sir Francis Drake, dying of a stroke after robbing not the Indians but the Spanish; Morgan the pirate and finally de Lesseps, author and chief figure of the most tragic farce since Don Quixote. Howarth's chapter on de Lesseps is a triumph of storytelling as this magnificent old man (who, at 65, after building the Suez Canal, took a wife of twenty and fathered a dozen children) rides his insuperable optimism against an immovable fate... Then came Teddy, who said, ""I took the Canal Zone and let Congress debate."" Very well done.

Pub Date: March 1, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: McGraw-Hill

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1966