Where Woodrow Wilson's classic study of constitutional government- discussed appreciatively by Acheson -- reached the...

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A CITIZEN LOOKS AT CONGRESS

Where Woodrow Wilson's classic study of constitutional government- discussed appreciatively by Acheson -- reached the conclusion of a declining executive and an ever-strengthening Congress, Dean Acheson's analysis comes full circle. Awed by the technical complexities of today's government, the extreme value of information almost unobtainable to the mere political body, and the speed and secrecy for national decisions, Acheson urges upon Congress a new role similar to a forum and proposes that only the presidency can gather, interpret, and intelligently act upon the facts. Congress should air for the public the major grievances of the day: Congress should argue out matters of policy, evaluate the pros and cons of each Federal measure, and above all explain. Only the executive can keep pace with world events, unravel the intricacies of governmental operations, think in the necessary terms of secret scientific and economic factors; only the executive can possess the knowledge for the proper running of the state. Acheson, admiringly, turns to de Tocqueville for authority, but he is himself persuasive. A controversy-rouser, forthright and modest in tone.

Pub Date: April 17, 1957

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harper

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1957