The atmosphere of the '30's is an oppressive constant in this story of a lonely girl who lives with her grandparents in...

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SOMEBODY WILL MISS ME

The atmosphere of the '30's is an oppressive constant in this story of a lonely girl who lives with her grandparents in depressing and (to Grandma) humiliating poverty. During the course of the story Abby becomes increasingly estranged from Grandma, whose affection she doubts, goes through a period of infatuation with Jesus (inseparable from her feeling for the minister), and -- after a couple of abortive friendships -- establishes a more rewarding relationship that only ends when the other girl is sent to reform school for running away from her beery, abusive father. Between the door-to-door peddling of Grandma's fudge and the scrounging of coal and wood, there are a few moments of fun and triumph and sexual stirrings -- but all in all it's a pretty bleak scene. Girls who share the current curiosity about the Depression will find here a credible recreation of its unrelieved dreariness and petty pretenses.

Pub Date: Nov. 5, 1971

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Crown

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1971