Women. Liberated women. The trouble is you've kicked one set of unfair rules. And so now you get educated"" although you are...

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JANE

Women. Liberated women. The trouble is you've kicked one set of unfair rules. And so now you get educated"" although you are not altogether sure at the end of Dee Wells' novel just what has been gained however much has been acquired. Jane is thirty odd -- one of those advantaged, bright young women with a job as a movie reviewer and three casual lovers who make regular appearances -- Tom, a professional thief on Wednesdays; Franklin -- a black, Harvard, tennisplaying lawyer on Mondays; and Anthony with his Hermes driving gloves and Gucci diary on Thursdays. In other words as her friend Angela says, ""a poor peer, a nigger and a burglar."" Then Jane becomes pregnant leaving her to wonder whose baby it will be and what color. Until now the novel is clever with scenes set, issues raised, and characters noticed with just the right touches even if rarely going below the surfaces it catches so stylishly. But then Jane has her baby (he looks like Tom who is in real trouble -- ends up on a slab in the morgue) and falls in love, or so it seems, with Franklin who then decides he can't go on living as a white nigger. At this point it does more than attract the eye -- it engages your sympathies and succeeds in being both amusing and affectionate even where it lacks say the moral/psychological nuances which say Margaret Drabble lends to the emancipated but still restricted choices facing the young woman today -- a Pandora about to be stung. In any case, enjoyable.

Pub Date: Jan. 4, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Viking

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1973