For the first time, the unexpurgated diaries which the statesman and diplomat of Revolutionary fame kept during the years of...

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A DIARY OF THE FRENCH REVOLUTION

For the first time, the unexpurgated diaries which the statesman and diplomat of Revolutionary fame kept during the years of the French Revolution. He was our Minister to France during those days of terror, and with Franklin was the outstanding American of 18th century Europe. His was a ministry which involved tactful handling of the problems of the debt, efforts to interest various countries in colonization in the new America, careful balancing of the relations with France and England -- and all of this comes out in his diaries. But the general surface impression is a social and human one -- he quite fancied himself with the fair sex -- he knew everyone -- and the Paris political and social roster appears in these pages. His sympathy, while on the side of liberal policies, was with the monarchy, and his Diaries end with the execution of the King in 1793. His great-granddaughter has done a skillful bit of editing, and the result is an urbane and entertaining human document. This is a very important book, an essential item for all public libraries and college reference shelves, a document that thorough students of America's diplomatic history will want to own. Not a book for immediate large sales, but a book for permanent stock.

Pub Date: March 21, 1939

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Houghton, Mifflin

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1939