This isn't going to drive Andy and the Lion out of print. It follows in the spoor of the Androcles legend in the person of...

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BROTHER JEROME AND THE LION

This isn't going to drive Andy and the Lion out of print. It follows in the spoor of the Androcles legend in the person of Brother Jerome, a naive monk with heavy evertones in words and pictures of his St. Francis of Assisi qualities. Brother Jerome plucked a thorn from the paw of a grateful lion and took the gentle beast back to the monastery where the other monks distrusted the lion's lamb-like ways. They accused the lion of eating their donkey when that animal disappeared. When it turned up in a camel train, the lion's ferocious roar helped Brother Jerome recover the stolen donkey. The legend, as retold here, is weak to pointlessness and the illustrations play to adult indulgence toward the humor inherent in the idea of the childlike monk. Mr. Reid uses a tonsured cartoon figure very much in the vein of those cartoons about monks that regularly appear in the New Yorker.

Pub Date: May 25, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Abelard-Schuman

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1966