Not dinosaurs themselves but dinosaur hunting is Shuttlesworth's subject, with only a short summary of geological time and a...

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TO FIND A DINOSAUR

Not dinosaurs themselves but dinosaur hunting is Shuttlesworth's subject, with only a short summary of geological time and a sort of annotated list of ""Tyrannosaurus and other giants"" as background. Shuttlesworth begins with Sir Richard Owen, who named the ""terrible lizards"" in 1841 (his wife found the first evidence, fossil teeth), and briefly describes the work of later paleontologists from the American Museum's Roy Andrews who discovered the Protoceratops eggs on the Gobi to Robert Salkin, a Newark (New Jersey) teacher who takes school children on field trips and who receives more attention here than anyone. Included also are short chapters on how museum staffs assemble skeletons (the American Museum's 67-foot Brontosaurus took four years) and create models. But as the discoveries and field work (except perhaps for Salkin's project) will be familiar to readers of Andrews, Colbert, Pringle, Ravielli and others, who tell far more about dinosaurs in the process, and as Shuttlesworth herself goes further into behind-the-scenes museum work in her Dodos and Dinosaurs, it hardly seems worthwhile to dig up the same old bones once again.

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1973