Montana has lots of local color but little substance in this chatty, patchy view. History appears apropos of the...

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MONTANA

Montana has lots of local color but little substance in this chatty, patchy view. History appears apropos of the ""adventures"" of Lewis and Clark (""Think of being the first civilized men to see all this""), the mountain men and missionaries; the gold strike comes under Gold and statehood never comes (until the appendix). There is no climate, only scattered effects of bad weather; there are no cities except as sites of gold (Helena), copper (Butte), oil (Billings), water power (Great Falls) and there is no mention of Missoula, the third largest, at all. Resources there are aplenty, including ""Treasures on the Earth"" (cattle, sheep, grain), but processing is slighted; indeed, scientific terminology is downright ""peculiar."" (Specialists use such words but ""not all of them talk this way all the time. . . . They also say 'My wife told me to bring home a dozen eggs' . . . like anybody else."") Transportation figures (with particular attention to the Johnson Flying Service) and so, under ""The Forest Goes On and On,"" does lumbering -- clear-cut lumbering to allow of ""even-aged forests"" instead of wasteful ""uneven-aged"" ones. The innumerable pleasures range from snow to ""spooky places,"" while the famous people are not only Colorful Characters but, with two exceptions one of whom is ""My Hero"" Gary Cooper), positively bloody -- which leaves no room for the likes of Burton Wheeler. Gun ho.

Pub Date: Feb. 12, 1971

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Coward, McCann & Geoghegan

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1971