More of Dr. Cain's circular, self-congratulatory ruminations, this time in and around the subject of work. The framework is...

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YOUNG PEOPLE AND WORK

More of Dr. Cain's circular, self-congratulatory ruminations, this time in and around the subject of work. The framework is ostensibly psychological; his professional solution for a case of identity crisis is a session with the Dictionary of Occupational Titles and the cultivation of will power (a.k.a. ""volitional behavior""). On the political front, Cain gets in elaborately condescending digs at the ""Youth Movement"" and feminism (""Many of the so-called Women's Lib movements were pretty sick and they knew it themselves""), while insisting on the impartial applicability of his advice: ""At least you don't want to be a failure no matter who is in power."" When he gets down to specific pointers on job hunting, the advice is predictably uptight and redundant--arrive exactly five minutes early for your interview and sit up straight (""don't sprawl out as if you were at Woodstock""). Anyone who suspects that this is a put-on will be reassured by Cain's continual assertions of sincerity. . .""Seriously, I'm not being sarcastic now.

Pub Date: Dec. 1, 1971

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: John Day

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 1971