Originally scheduled for Fall and reported as such on 10/1/45 under the title, Traffic in Patriots. ""A distinctly personal,...

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HOUSE NEAR PARIS

Originally scheduled for Fall and reported as such on 10/1/45 under the title, Traffic in Patriots. ""A distinctly personal, often unabashed story of an American woman in the underground who stayed on, of her own choice, after the fall of France. As drama, it does not come up to Etta Shiber's Paris Underground. One questions the continued interest in this field already crowded. (If we could say that in October how much truer it is in February!) The author was the wife of Jacques Tartiere, who was with De Gaullo in England and was later to die in Syria. Drue decided to join the resistance; she rented a house in German-occupied Barbizon. After the American entry into the war she was interned for several months, but simulated hemorrhages, symptoms of cancer, until she won release and returned to Barbizon, where her house became one of the stations on the underground for rescuing and sending on American and English aviators. Five of the boys stayed with her for a period of two months before the liberation. An unself-conscious, if sometimes too intimate, record; smooth reading.

Pub Date: Feb. 25, 1946

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1946