The author does a surgical job on probably the most controversial figure in politics today -- and shows how a good man has...

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HENRY WALLACE: The Man and the Myth

The author does a surgical job on probably the most controversial figure in politics today -- and shows how a good man has taken a wrong turn. An attractive and an admirable person, Wallace is dangerous politically because of being all things to all men. He preaches the Common Man -- but lacks the human touch and the political imagination necessary to success. His opponents- in his eyes- are all evil, until the swing in his direction. He can betray friends and party with no sense of disloyalty. His high sounding phrases seem grand and uplifting but when analyzed show contradictions. While Secretary of Commerce during the war, he speaks highly of business men and industrialists. Later as editor and political figure, he excoriates them. Not a pleasant portrait of a man considered by many as an idealist, a truly religious man, but the that exposes his weaknesses. Valuable for his opponents as a campaign factor, should his position threaten the election results seriously.

Pub Date: Feb. 18, 1948

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Vanguard Press

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1948