What kids wouldn't want to leave home and set up on their own -- if camp was a completely equipped guest cottage just across...

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KIDS COMMUNE

What kids wouldn't want to leave home and set up on their own -- if camp was a completely equipped guest cottage just across the pond, groceries came from night raids on the parents' kitchen, and older brother Tony brought along his $67.00 savings? But even with these advantages the four young Kershaws' venture fails in little more than a day: the neighborhood children they invite to join them don't last that long, and during their second night, with the parents (""the tyrant and his consort"") miles away at a party, Lucy Kershaw, the youngest at seven, gets sick. The others have to rush her to the hospital in a canoe fastened between two bicycles because none of the grown-ups they phone will take them seriously, but the alerted parents arrive in time to speed Lucy by car along the last stretch. When it's all over Tony translates his formerly non-negotiable demands to a more tactfully worded ""Bill of Rights"" which his father agrees is reasonable ""so long as you put 'vice versa' at the end of each."" Hildick manages all this without moralizing but without much vitality either. Or any perspective on either the stereotypically phony-liberal middle class father, the four children who are observed only from the outside, or the ironies of their ""uprising."" Of course there are no doubt others like them, daydreaming along just these lines.

Pub Date: Nov. 6, 1972

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: David White

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1972