Edie's been introduced before in Terrible, Horrible Edie (1960) and she exists as one of those rare girls in fiction who...

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EDIE ON THE WARPATH

Edie's been introduced before in Terrible, Horrible Edie (1960) and she exists as one of those rare girls in fiction who lives her own life and thinks her own thoughts in a world bounded by elders and juniors. Like Queenie Peavy, reviewed on page 428-J-140, Edie Cares is a tomboy with spunk but unlike Queenie, Edie is not so much in conflict with her well-ordered upper-middle class existence as she is actively plotting against its weakest barriers with a shrewd sense of just how much strain her pressure points will take. The year is 1907, Edie is eleven, the scene shifts between New England and resort Florida. Wherever she goes, Edie is beset by and equal to a family of older brothers, younger stepsisters, her stepmother and her father. Her first run-in is with a Suffragette parade, a movement of which her father heartily disapproves. Another shows Edie as a visionary baby-sitter to her young stepsisters who barely appreciate her determined, demented efforts to give them freedoms their nurse would never allow. Her trip South by train to join her asthmatic stepmother (not allergic to her hard-to-get-close-to Edie) is fraught with incidental excitement/ amusement and...Edie is altogether a pleasure. Her readers will be in on Edie's approach to life--it's not story telegraphing, it's good story telling and a grip on what makes up the best image of independent, rambunctious girls.

Pub Date: April 20, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harcourt, Brace & World

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1966