Sportsman Smith here proves himself a good trapper -- for he baits each chapter with the appeal of spruce, wild life and...

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A TREASURY OF THE MAINE WOODS

Sportsman Smith here proves himself a good trapper -- for he baits each chapter with the appeal of spruce, wild life and craggy mountain top. Mr. Smith's excursions into hilarity seem almost involuntary. His ""close-up"" description of a fishing trip with President Eisenhower -- of the imaginary conversations leading up to actuality is fine candid comedy. And he encompasses the humor and pathos of age and youth and family life when he describes tranquility regained in his Maine woods cabin after the departure of his son, daughter-in-law and ""enchanting grandson"" -- tranquillity soon followed by the certainty of desertion and finally reassurance in a package sent by his son from California. Personal, pleasant and very human --the appeal here has been tested in leading magazines.

Pub Date: Jan. 8, 1957

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Frederick Fell

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1957