Good -- but not top. Two long stories, novelettes, the first the title story the second, Trees Die At The Tops. Nobody's In...

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NOBODY'S IN TOWN

Good -- but not top. Two long stories, novelettes, the first the title story the second, Trees Die At The Tops. Nobody's In Town gives a cross section of the New York that stays in town through the summer, as seen through the fragmentary candid camera shots of the man whose wife and child have gone abroad, of the colored girl who ""does for him"" and her lover, who plays in a Harlem band, of the green grocer who must be a step ahead of his competitors, and the tricks of his trade, of the garbage collector and the bottle of champagne that turned him from a yen-man to the head of his prospective manage. Vignettes, with Edna Ferber's gift for getting at the human aspects of her characters. The second story is somewhat of a thesis story. An old man is dying. He does not tamper with his will which makes his heirs rich, but he does pull the strings while he is on the verge of death, and summons all of them to his bedside, to make them cross the continent, just once, over the trail their forbears took as pioneers. The story parallels the old way -- and the new. The Ferber name will sell, particularly as she is no neophant in the shorter forms of fiction. Good for rentals, as against the average short.

Pub Date: Feb. 11, 1937

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday, Doran

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1937