In the author's introductory note the wolverine, a type of weasel, is described as ""...the bane of the trapper,...

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THREE WOLVERINES OF RUSHING VALLEY

In the author's introductory note the wolverine, a type of weasel, is described as ""...the bane of the trapper, methodically ruining his catches but rarely falling victim to his traps. He breaks into cabins, eats the food stocks, and steals any portable items handy. A nocturnal hunter, he does not hesitate, when full-grown, to attack sheep and reindeer."" This animal, which is sometimes known simply as ""the glutton,"" seems about the least likely to succeed in attracting human sympathy. This story of a young wolverine and his parents, who lived in northern Sweden, does not try to cover up or to soften their behavior. They are provided with thoughts, but these are just verbalizations of their natural instincts. The pull of these instincts catch at the reader, and by the time the men who share the same territory discover the presence of the wolverines and start launching an attack on them, it's the wolverines you're cheering for. The bleak wilderness is clearly described in a well-written reconstruction of a wild animal's life.

Pub Date: March 31, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Dutton

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1966