A prolix anatomy of a murder, sans sex and as hefty as a hero sandwich, which prosecutes the law rather than an offender and...

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THE ADVERSARIES

A prolix anatomy of a murder, sans sex and as hefty as a hero sandwich, which prosecutes the law rather than an offender and deals with the nolo contendere fact that Sam Tabor, a social worker who is something of a nonentity himself, suddenly shoots a Chief Justice of the U.S. On an impulse or as later described -- in a ""moment of inadvertency."" Norman Bannerman, one of those spangled public performers undertakes the case as ""a great adventure"" primarily to unshackle the law from the McNaughton (sic throughout) Rule while opposing him is a hardheaded and actually nicer assistant D.A., Jim Ambrose. And between them a number of psychiatrists who generally agree that he's schizophrenic for as much as the tag means as well as a poor performer as a husband (a circumcision at age thirty?). Linn writes a stylelessly competent prose but there's just too much of it (600 pages) for the proportionately slighter story. It's best read as documentary-commentary on some of the issues now discussed while remembering that a court trial is the oldest Baileywick of all in terms of a readymade readership.

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Saturday Review Press -- dist. by Dutton

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1973