A clumsy, inspirational first novel about an impoverished young woman who boldly pulls herself up by her bootstraps....

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JENNY'S MOUNTAIN

A clumsy, inspirational first novel about an impoverished young woman who boldly pulls herself up by her bootstraps. Twenty-three-year-old Jenny Williams, son Billy, and infant daughter Corey lead a life of crushing rural poverty near a junkyard outside the little town of Dolby, Colorado--while husband Mike, a sometime construction worker, is chasing a dream of finding gold in an old mine up in the mountains. Jenny may be young, but she's awful feisty; the local men are always having to chase her away from masculine pursuits (""A mine's no place for a woman. . .Poker's a man's game,"" etc.). Naturally, she doesn't pay any attention. She saves her neighbor Karen from Karen's brutal husband, Tully, and stands up to Tully when he threatens her. Then she gets a job as a waitress in Mom Bradley's Bar and Cafe, and fights off advances from Mom's drunken alcoholic son, Richard (although the kisses of a rich, handsome truck driver known as Bigfoot are somewhat more welcome). Finally, Jenny moves the family up to a cabin near Mike's mine, and a steady, extremely simple-minded process of role reversal begins: since Mike has become ""spooked"" in the mine, Jenny begins drilling for the gold ore, while Mike takes care of the kids. On the way to a predictable happy ending is an equally predictable (and crudely lachrymose) tragedy: Mike and Richard Bradley are both killed in a head-on collision. But never fear--Jenny sells the mine and the land for a small fortune to a venal real-estate developer, and in steps none other than truck-driver Bigfoot, who has been following the story from afar. At the close, Jenny has her man--and her money, too. An old-fashioned romance disguised as a saga of consciousness-raising. The former is heavy-handed, and the latter unbelievable.

Pub Date: Dec. 21, 1987

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: St. Martin's

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15, 1987