A generous selection of Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine stories from the Sixties and early Seventies, almost 30 of them....

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ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S TALES TO SCARE YOU STIFF

A generous selection of Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine stories from the Sixties and early Seventies, almost 30 of them. And, if there are no tours-deforce here--there's always at least one in the more international Ellery Queen gatherings--there's also none of the precious comic stuff (except, perhaps, a ""Solar Pons"" takeoff by August Derleth) that often pads out the Queen volumes. Among the neatest: Donald E. Westlake's 1960 tale of a cop coaxing and cajoling a would be suicide off a ledge in Brooklyn (even before becoming our top farceur-suspenser, Westlake was sprightly enough to perk up a slice of melodrama); Lawrence Block's morbidly ironic fable of a man, his mistress, and their blackmailer; and Arthur Porges' twilight-zoney anecdote about a DNA transplant that turns a hack pianist into a master. One novella--William P. McGivern's ""Graveyard Shift."" One oddity of literary interest--an early Kate Wilhelm (married woman is taken hostage by a bank robber, has identity crisis) that foreshadows Anne Tyler's Earthly Possessions, but is disappointingly obvious. And one gem of film-historical interest--Jack Ritchie's ""The Green Heart,"" which inspired the Elaine May film, A New Leaf (the story has the semi-sentimental ending that May unsuccessfully fought against). Few old-fashioned detectives here--mostly criminals and victims and the gradations in between; a solid, professional American assortment.

Pub Date: Dec. 31, 1978

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Dial

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 1978