There is something rather tantalizing about Eleanor Helme's books. They have a certain amateurishness, which sometimes shows...

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RUNAWAY MIKE

There is something rather tantalizing about Eleanor Helme's books. They have a certain amateurishness, which sometimes shows itself in awkward phraseology or casualness of story structure. But in spite of it -- perhaps because of it -- there's a distinct originality, a flavor of the out of doors and English moors and woods and countryside, of horses and ponies and dogs and stable folk, of nice people who like animals and outdoory things. And the charming pencil drawings by T. Ivester Lloyd sustain the text admirably....The present story has more story content than earlier ones. A tinker's boy, part gypsy, runs away from his good-for-nothing parents, and with his pony and his dog manages to make a place for himself with the right sort of people. A book every youngster who loves horses will claim as his -- or her -- own.

Pub Date: March 1, 1937

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Scribner

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1937