The sporadically episodic experiences of a young lady from Back Bay Boston abroad, from the '20's on through to this war,...

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LARGELY FICTION

The sporadically episodic experiences of a young lady from Back Bay Boston abroad, from the '20's on through to this war, these reflect a certain continental charm and casual morality, a seasoned sophistication, but in no way adhere to the conventional strictures of the novel. Mary Elizabeth Trotter, of vested social prestige, elopes, while summering abroad, with Hungarian Count Bela Palody, whose many previous marriages had given him a certain notoriety. Her years with him, which outnumber those of her predecessors, provide many exotic excitements, and also some more medieval, and culminate when she loses an eye due to a fracas with her husband. Moving on to Salzburg, then to Paris, Mary Elizabeth becomes a permanent American-in-exile, entering the world of high fashion and finding particular provocation in the three fabulous, fascinating de Musignan brothers. With the war, she returns to America, if only for the duration, for it is Paris that holds her heart. A fastidious, nostalgic and often clever appreciation of foreign scenes and characters and contretemps gives this its special- if not too general- attraction. A picture of a vanished world- Parisian society, a castle in Czechoslovakia, shooting on the Polish marshes -- this has a certain worldly appeal. A first novel.

Pub Date: Nov. 2, 1948

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Houghton, Mifflin

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1948