Apartment buildings, tenement clothes lines, garbage cans, Mom in pants and sneakers--Schick's shaded pencil drawings...

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NEIGHBORHOOD KNIGHT

Apartment buildings, tenement clothes lines, garbage cans, Mom in pants and sneakers--Schick's shaded pencil drawings project a tempered view of the Neighborhood Knight's reality as the first-person text lets us in on his sustaining fantasy: ""The King has been gone a long time. . . . I protect the Princess and the Queen. . . . Every morning the sun comes up in the corner of my window just the way I tell it to. . . . I'm always ready to defend the Princess and the Queen. . . . Today I built the tallest castle in the class. . . (and, when Billy made it fall down and Joey and Carlos laughed) I hit Brian and Joey and Carlos. . . . An army is invading my castle. . . . I'm fighting them all. . . ."" Schick's forte has always been a sort of soft focus, no comment verity and there are no doubt many neighborhood knights who will recognize the insecurity and compensating dreams of power. But princesses who would just as soon defend themselves, thank you, could be driven to firing off the nearest catapult. . . and a lot of queens in sneakers will prefer to bolster their knights in less stereotyping ways.

Pub Date: March 29, 1976

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 64

Publisher: Greenwillow/Morrow

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1976