Horwitz visits a number of Appalachian craftspeople (almost all of them elderly) who invite her to ""set and talk awhile""...

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MOUNTAIN PEOPLE, MOUNTAIN CRAFTS

Horwitz visits a number of Appalachian craftspeople (almost all of them elderly) who invite her to ""set and talk awhile"" about their renowned homemade dulcimers, their jointed wooden toys (including the limberjack and the kickin' pig), their poppets (dolls) made from corn cobs or husks or dried apples, or their quilts based on traditional patterns with names like Jacobs's Ladder, Hearts and Gizzards, Delectable Mountain and Drunkard's Path. There is the fiddle maker who puts dried rattlesnake rattles inside every instrument to keep out dampness and spiders, the legally blind rug maker (one of several black lung widows in the collection) who makes braids with seven (some thirteen) plaits because the wider braids demand less of the sewing that taxes her eyes, and the carver now working on a unicorn: ""I never seen a unicorn, did you? They hain't got them in this part of the country but a girl sent me a picture from a tapestry in the Metropolitan Museum in New York so I decided to try and make one."" Horwitz quotes them directly and describes their work with respect for the strength and traditions, informed appreciation of their artistry, and a sharp ear for their eloquent speech.

Pub Date: May 15, 1974

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 144

Publisher: Lippincott

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1974