There's the usual moisture in the air (or as Mrs. Ogilvie puts it ""the drenched pungence of the storm-torn shore"") when...

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STRAWBERRIES IN THE SEA

There's the usual moisture in the air (or as Mrs. Ogilvie puts it ""the drenched pungence of the storm-torn shore"") when Rosa decides to divorce her golden if unfaithful Con whom she's had for three years before he takes her for all she has. And when she decides to make a new life for herself on Bennett's Island -- not that there aren't others ready to share it with her if she could forget Con -- a deaf cousin who drinks and paints, the patient Jamie who lobsters alongside her boat, and finally the man she shelters in a final stutter of melodrama. Rosa is one of Mrs. Ogilvie's larger conceptions -- she works like a man but abandons herself like a woman under the roof she's just patched -- a reminder to modern readers that they don't build them like that any more but then this is not a modern readership. One cannot overlook the fact however that it's as everbearing as those strawberries.

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: McGraw-Hill

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1973