From the first horseless carriage race in Jackson Park, Chicago, in 1895 to the streamlined numbers of the future, Elizabeth...

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THE EARLY DAYS OF AUTOMOBILES

From the first horseless carriage race in Jackson Park, Chicago, in 1895 to the streamlined numbers of the future, Elizabeth Janeway has taken to her subject with gusto. The book is lively and interesting, clips along at a good rate through the history of an invention, the conglomeration of ideas in Europe and America that made the auto, the contraption that was to become a tool rather than a toy. Through chapters on the various European makes, new steps in progress such as the self starter, Ford's controversy with patents and even early day habits and preparations for motoring, fans will find much to satisfy. It is difficult to classify the basic idea as anything more than a recapitulation of information that is getting cranked up and restarted in many another volume on the same theme.

Pub Date: Sept. 24, 1956

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1956