Either Ellen Conford has as much imagination as her heroine Victory Benneker, or she has a good memory for what it's like to...

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DREAMS OF VICTORY

Either Ellen Conford has as much imagination as her heroine Victory Benneker, or she has a good memory for what it's like to be one of those mousy, undistinguished kids who aren't nearly so uncommon as they, in their loneliness, believe themselves to be. Victory not only gets a scant six votes when she runs for class president, but she's a wallflower at her friend's coed party, flubs the role of litter in her school play and is even afraid to ride the Ferris wheel at the town carnival. Her self-confidence really bottoms out when she compares herself to Sharon ""Spider"" Webb, the universally acknowledged star of class 6-3, but in her fantasies Victory is always a credit to her name -- whether she's winning the Miss America pageant, making her Presidential acceptance speech, uncovering a spy ring, or distributing a million dollars to her envious schoolmates. Unlike Victory's teacher, we couldn't give an A+ to that composition on ""Imagination"" which finally wins her some recognition but Victory herself gets high marks for her spirited, often humorous battle against the agonies of being ordinary.

Pub Date: March 22, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1973