Mary McLeod Bethune, who wanted to be a missionary to Africa but wound up educating black Americans, lacks the obvious...

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MARY McLEOD BETHUNE

Mary McLeod Bethune, who wanted to be a missionary to Africa but wound up educating black Americans, lacks the obvious dramatic appeal of Rosa Parks whom Greenfield profiled in 1975, and, as projected here, she is a dull study compared to June Jordan's Fannie Lou Hamer (1972) in the same series. However, Greenfield does take readers a brisk step ahead of Radford's 1973 MMB--as she traces Mary's progress from the fields of her family's South Carolina farm to the first black school in the area, then on scholarship to Scotia Seminary and Moody Bible Institute, at last to Daytona Beach, Florida, to found her own school for black children, and, during World War II, to Washington (where her statue now stands in a park) for the National Youth Organization. Serviceable.

Pub Date: March 16, 1977

ISBN: 0064461688

Page Count: -

Publisher: Crowell

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1977