This differs from the Henry Collins Brown book in that it is an account of the experience a manic -- depressive went through...

READ REVIEW

A MIND RESTORED: The Story of Jim Curran

This differs from the Henry Collins Brown book in that it is an account of the experience a manic -- depressive went through in two private institutions and one public institution, and is clearly a defense of public institutions and an expose of the dangers and limitations of private sanitariums. An average man -- not a public figure like William Seabrook -- reviews his life, following the process demanded by the psychiatrists, tracing the disrupting influences to their sources, and indicating the progress of the mental disease from indifference to a state of apathy with attendant suicidal tendencies. In each case with the private institutions he returned to the world too soon. Finally, he committed himself voluntarily to a state institution, remained there two years, reached a gradual comprehension of his own case, and came back slowly to normal life. He offers constructive criticism, but in the main has highest praise for the state institution. The Seabrook introduction vouches for the soundness and authenticity of the facts and the need for the material.

Pub Date: May 29, 1937

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Putnam, Minton, Balch

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1937