Proceeding from the premise that all tenants are ""second-class citizens"" and that all landlords are venal and monstrous,...

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THE TENANT SURVIVAL BOOK

Proceeding from the premise that all tenants are ""second-class citizens"" and that all landlords are venal and monstrous, this slanted-to-loaded activist primer ignores many things large and small -- whether it's the fact that most of the victims here of unlivable living quarters would founder in a great deal of this book's legal and judicial detail, or the economic realities which have led to the abandonment of so many properties which only federal measures and funds can probably salvage. Wider remedial suggestions do not come up for consideration -- only what the tenant can do in situ -- beginning with organizing themselves for actions which might then lead to displays, boycotts, etc. This suggests that sooner or later you will need a lawyer -- or have to go to court -- and this is all discussed in detail. So too are tenant strikes -- not a new but increasingly prevalent means; collective bargaining; and the whole new squatter movement. In between lie far more extensive areas of neglect -- such as writing to the New York City Rent Control Commission (whether you're a tenant or that miscreant landlord) and waiting for two years -- try it -- only to get an answer which has nothing to do with the request, so hopeless is the whole bind in which both tenants and small landlords are trapped.

Pub Date: Nov. 7, 1972

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1972