In this, a more serious book than Silver Street Woman and more forcefully written, the author again tells his story against...

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THE ROYAL CITY

In this, a more serious book than Silver Street Woman and more forcefully written, the author again tells his story against the maze of that period of New Mexican history (the late 1600's) when the Pueblo Indians revolted against the Spanish at Santa Fe. Luis Ribera, his central figure, is loyal to both sides; he has a genius for jumping into a muddle- and then uttering eternal truths. The only people who don't like him are those disturbed by all freedom. The inquisition reaches out its long arm to hound him for speaking and acting out of turn. He learns the Pueblos' plan for bloody revolt and warns the Governor, but too late. We follow the Spanish on their interminable death maroh from Santa Fe to El Paso, and by its and only a few of the many characters met in the story have survived to see a new phase of the death struggle of the Spanish Empire in North America. The book founders -- as do most of the factual histories- in tortuous explanations of the myriad political and religious machinations of the era. But this is a readable tale of that terrible and strangely romantic period.

Pub Date: Sept. 10, 1956

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Hanover House

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1956