Dr. romm considers The Heart of Man a counterpart to The Art of Loving. The present volume reveals the other face of Janus,...

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THE HEART OF MAN Its Genius for Good and Evil

Dr. romm considers The Heart of Man a counterpart to The Art of Loving. The present volume reveals the other face of Janus, however, as he is concerned here assentially with the nature of evil (and by the converse of its definition, good) and man's capacity for it. Dr. Fromm equates evil with the tendencies in man toward death, the regression to the pre-human ass against the good of progressing toward life and True humanness. He sees necrophilia or the love of death, extreme narcissism, and ncestuous symbiosis as sthe ""syndrome of decay."" Man is free to choose between evil and good, but previous choices have their affect: the more choices made against life, the harder it is to avoid a hardened heart, to turn back. Yet this is almost always possible. In a social context, Dr. Fromm observes the influence of a Hitler or a Stalin and analyzes their ability to appeal. More clinical than The Art of Loving, this will mainly be of interest in terms of its religious-phychological equation. It appears as the twelfth volume in the Religious Perspectives series.

Pub Date: Oct. 7, 1964

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harper & Row

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1964