As these confections proliferate (p. 882, J-338), one is less inclined to indulge them. The color-accented words, the...

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HARMENSZ, VAN RIJN REMBRANDT

As these confections proliferate (p. 882, J-338), one is less inclined to indulge them. The color-accented words, the sententious phrases writ large (""The more we use our eyes, the MORE WE WILL LEARN of PAINTING and of LIFE itself""), the sentimentality and simplicism trivialize such intense artists as Durer, Velasquez and Rembrandt. As usual, what we have in each case is less the artist's lite or his work (the color reproductions notwithstanding) than Mr. Raboff's embellishments on them, some quite fanciful. Durer inspires him to the timely but erroneous observation that ""not until late in the 20th century"" did men again ""wear their hair long""; to the attribution of sexual characteristics to two peony blossoms (the male is the taller, the female ""with its bowed petals is paler and softer""); to misidentification of the owl's presumed wisdom with keenness of vision. And while he rhapsodizes about the obvious, the obscure (e.g. some of the Durer prints) goes unexplained. Lightly doesn't do everything.

Pub Date: Dec. 4, 1970

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 1970