If Edgar Lee Masters were to have written a Spoon River AnthoLogy in the form of a novel this is the sort of novel it might...

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GREEN POND

If Edgar Lee Masters were to have written a Spoon River AnthoLogy in the form of a novel this is the sort of novel it might well have turned out to be. For Green Pond -- over the span of two doctors' lives -- comes into being and changes from a one horse shay town into a bustling North Carolina industrial city. Old Doc Thornwell is the general practitioner of the past; his son Vic Thornwell is the modern surgeon. And for both, their lives were entangled with their profession, and in turn with the lives of the community. Old Doc was a lusty male and fathered numerous offspring, white and mulatto -- and to many of them he gave recognition of one sort or another. His ""yard children"" were twin sons, born to Naomi, the young wife whose secret vice of kleptomania was hidden in the family. And of these boys one was Jake, who became the parish minister, catering to the foibles of his flock; the other was Vi, dedicated to his music and his profession -- and loving one woman only, Jezebel Mathis, spawn of Satan, who gave herself to many men, but wanted only Vic, the unattainable, untouchable. It is a vigorous, pulsing tale, as permeated with sex as -- for instance- Sir, fe -- but somehow the sex theme plays counterpoint to larger issues of life and death, faith and desperation, and the fabric of man's inner being. There are many minor characters, good and bad, weak and strong- none more moving than some of the Negroes, Mama Amazon, who nursed the twins, Old Prince Blue, and others. It is a powerful saga- and Evan Brandon can write. Don't overlook it.

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 1955

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Vanguard

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1955